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new england


Optimum Planting Time: September 15th � November 15th
USDA Hardiness Zones: 3, 4, 5

A Guide to U.S. Bulb Planting Regions

Region "A" � New England

General Instructions:

Plant bulbs in the fall starting when nighttime temperatures stay between 40-50�F. But, be sure to plant approximately six weeks before the ground freezes to allow sufficient time for rooting. Bulbs will root best in cool soil and once rooted undergo natural changes that keep them from freezing. Water your bulbs after planting to help them start the rooting process.

After planting, apply slow release "bulb food" fertilizer on the top of the ground to supply nutrients for the second year's bloom. (Bulbs are already fully charged with energy for peak flowering performance in their first spring bloom season.) Do not put the fertilizer in the hole with the bulb as this may burn the bulb's tender roots. PLEASE NOTE: Modern bone meal generally has little value as a bulb fertilizer and often draws rodents and dogs that dig up the bulbs looking for bones!

After the ground cools or freezes, cover your bulb beds with a lightweight mulch (pine needles, buckwheat hulls, straw or chopped up leaves) 2 � 4 inches thick to help keep down weeds and maintain a consistently cool soil temperature.

Special Note: For those in colder areas, it may be possible to "extend" the reach of marginally winter-hardy bulbs by planting in warmer 'micro-climates.' Tips: a) choose sites protected from wind and extreme cold exposure, b) mulch heavily, and c) plant deeper. It's worth a try if you really want to grow something "just beyond" your hardiness zone range.

A Sampling of Bulbs for Perennializing: (return for several years)

Narcissus �Accent�
N. �Actaea�
N. �Sun Disc�
Tulipa �Pink Impression�
T. �Lady Jane�
T. �Maureen�
Allium christophii
Crocus chrysanthus �Ard Schenk�
Erythronium �Pagoda�

A Sampling of Bulbs for Naturalizing: (return & multiply)

Scilla siberica
N. poeticus var. recurvus

T. clusiana 'Cynthia'
Allium moly
Eranthis cilicica
Galanthus nivalis
Colchicum byzantinum
Crocus tommasinianus

Mid-Atlantic Coastal


Optimum Planting Time: October 1st - November 30th
USDA Hardiness Zones: 6,7,8

A Guide to U.S. Bulb Planting Regions

Region "B" � Mid-Atlantic Coastal

In your area, you may be able to grow many of the tropical and other marginally hardy plants by planting in warmer 'micro-climates' protected from exposure to winds and extreme cold. If you're concerned about bulb foliage that emerges in the fall or winter, put a light pine needle or straw mulch around the leaves to protect them from frost burn (but don't worry, such leaf damage is only cosmetic and won't affect the flowers).

General Instructions:
Plant bulbs in the fall starting when nighttime temperatures stay between 40-50�F. But, be sure to plant approximately six weeks before the ground freezes to allow sufficient time for rooting. Bulbs will root best in cool soil and once rooted undergo natural changes that keep them from freezing. Water your bulbs after planting to help them start the rooting process.

After planting, apply slow release "bulb food" fertilizer on the top of the ground to supply nutrients for the second year's bloom. (Bulbs are already fully charged with energy for peak flowering performance in their first spring bloom season.) Do not put the fertilizer in the hole with the bulb as this may burn the bulb's tender roots. PLEASE NOTE: Modern bone meal generally has little value as a bulb fertilizer and often draws rodents and dogs that dig up the bulbs looking for bones!

After the ground cools or freezes, cover your bulb beds with a lightweight mulch (pine needles, buckwheat hulls, straw or chopped up leaves) 2 � 4 inches thick to help keep down weeds and maintain a consistently cool soil temperature.

Special Note: If voles or other animal pests are eating your tulips, crocuses or lilies, spraying the bulbs with a product such as Ropel may help protect them. To ward off subterranean "bulb rustlers," try placing Vole Block or sharp granules of a gravel-like substance around bulbs to help create a physical barrier. Regarding deer, trials of products such as Deer Off, which must be applied at emergence and until bloom, have had some success.

A Sampling of Bulbs for Perennializing: (return for several years)

Narcissus 'Camelot'
N. 'Tahiti'
N. 'Quail'
N. 'Rip van Winkle'
Tulipa 'Flair'
T. 'Parade'
T. praestans fusilier
Allium nigrum
Anemone blanda 'White Splendour'
Hyacinthus 'Blue Giant'

A Sampling of Bulbs for Naturalizing: (return & multiply)

N. bulbocodium conspicuus
N. obvallaris
T. clusiana var. chrysantha
Chionodoxa forbesii
Crocus tommasinianus
Hyacinthoides hispanicus
Ipheion uniflorum
Ornithogalum nutans

region - c - appalachian


Optimum Planting Time: September 15th - November 30th
USDA Hardiness Zones: 5, 6

A Guide to U.S. Bulb Planting Regions

Region "C" - Appalachian

You have a moderate to cold winter climate and mild summers with adequate moisture. The variety of elevations in your region offers many opportunities for different planting styles.

General Instructions:
Plant bulbs in the fall starting when nighttime temperatures stay between 40-50�F. But, be sure to plant approximately six weeks before the ground freezes to allow sufficient time for rooting. Bulbs will root best in cool soil and once rooted undergo natural changes that keep them from freezing. Water your bulbs after planting to help them start the rooting process.

After planting, apply slow release "bulb food" fertilizer on the top of the ground to supply nutrients for the second year's bloom. (Bulbs are already fully charged with energy for peak flowering performance in their first spring bloom season.) Do not put the fertilizer in the hole with the bulb as this may burn the bulb's tender roots. PLEASE NOTE: Modern bone meal generally has little value as a bulb fertilizer and often draws rodents and dogs that dig up the bulbs looking for bones!

After the ground cools or freezes, cover your bulb beds with a lightweight mulch (pine needles, buckwheat hulls, straw or chopped up leaves) 2 � 4 inches thick to help keep down weeds and maintain a consistently cool soil temperature.

Special Note: The opportunity to plant on banks and hillsides offers many creative possibilities for designs and artistic combinations - even spelling out words in flowers. Mulching in this climate may be important to protect bulb foliage from late spring frosts.

A Sampling of Bulbs for Perennializing: (return for several years)

Narcissus 'Avalon'
N. 'Ice Follies'
N. 'Cheerfulness'
N. '
Hawera'
Tulipa
'Apricot Beauty'
T. 'Monte Carlo'
T. 'Pink Impression'
Allium karataviense
Colchicum
'Waterlily'
Crocus sieberi 'Firefly'


A Sampling of Bulbs for Naturalizing: (return & multiply)

Chionodoxa sardensis
Crocus ancyrensis
'Golden Bunch'
Erythronium dens-canis (in woodland areas)
Fritillaria meleagris
(in damp meadow areas)
Geranium tuberosum
Hyacinthoides hispanica
Scilla bifolia

South Atlantic Coastal


Optimum Planting Time: October 15th - December 15th
USDA Hardiness Zones: 7, 8

A Guide to U.S. Bulb Planting Regions

Region "D" � South Atlantic Coastal

Yours is a moderate climate with hot moist summers and cool to cold moist winters. You will be able to grow an enormous number of spring-flowering bulbs successfully. However, due to your moist conditions, only specific bulb cultivars will perennialize well. Local experts and garden centers will have recommendations.

General Instructions:
Plant bulbs in the fall starting when nighttime temperatures stay between 40-50�F. But, be sure to plant approximately six weeks before the ground freezes to allow sufficient time for rooting. Bulbs will root best in cool soil and once rooted undergo natural changes that keep them from freezing. Water your bulbs after planting to help them start the rooting process.

After planting, apply slow release "bulb food" fertilizer on the top of the ground to supply nutrients for the second year's bloom. (Bulbs are already fully charged with energy for peak flowering performance in their first spring bloom season.) Do not put the fertilizer in the hole with the bulb as this may burn the bulb's tender roots. PLEASE NOTE: Modern bone meal generally has little value as a bulb fertilizer and often draws rodents and dogs that dig up the bulbs looking for bones!

After the ground cools or freezes, cover your bulb beds with a lightweight mulch (pine needles, buckwheat hulls, straw or chopped up leaves) 2 � 4 inches thick to help keep down weeds and maintain a consistently cool soil temperature.

Special Note: Most spring-flowering bulbs need to remain relatively dry during their dormancy. Do not plant them where you have 'mindless summer irrigation' (a sprinkler system that comes on like clockwork, whether you need it or not). Planting in elevated beds (6"-12" above normal soil level) will help to alleviate this problem and aid in perennialization.

A Sampling of Bulbs for Perennializing: (return for several years)

Narcissus 'Rijnveld's Early Sensation'
N. 'Avalanche'
N. 'Bridal Crown'
N. 'Sweetness'
N. 'Jumblie'
Tulipa
'Orange Emperor'
T. 'Beauty of Apeldoorn'
Leucojum aestivum

A Sampling of Bulbs for Naturalizing: (return & multiply)

N. bulbocodium (in the lawn)
N. jonquilla (loves hot summer baking)
T. saxatilis
Allium sphaerocephalon
Arum italicum
(in the shade)
Chionodoxa forbesii
Crocus tommasinianus
Ipheion uniflorum
(in the lawn)

Region "E" � Great Lakes


Optimum Planting Time: September 15th � November 15th
USDA Hardiness Zones: 5, 6, 7

A Guide to U.S. Bulb Planting Regions

Region "E" � Great Lakes
You have the benefit of a climate moderated by the Great Lakes. However, you can experience fairly extreme climate changes and often heavy winds. Choosing shorter, sturdier cultivars that stand up better to the windy conditions may be appropriate, depending on local conditions. Later blooming cultivars may be less affected by late freezes but their flowers may not last as long if hot spells hit in late spring.

General Instructions:
Plant bulbs in the fall starting when nighttime temperatures stay between 40-50�F. But, be sure to plant approximately six weeks before the ground freezes to allow sufficient time for rooting. Bulbs will root best in cool soil and once rooted undergo natural changes that keep them from freezing. Water your bulbs after planting to help them start the rooting process.

After planting, apply slow release "bulb food" fertilizer on the top of the ground to supply nutrients for the second year's bloom. (Bulbs are already fully charged with energy for peak flowering performance in their first spring bloom season.) Do not put the fertilizer in the hole with the bulb as this may burn the bulb's tender roots. PLEASE NOTE: Modern bone meal generally has little value as a bulb fertilizer and often draws rodents and dogs that dig up the bulbs looking for bones!

After the ground cools or freezes, cover your bulb beds with a lightweight mulch (pine needles, buckwheat hulls, straw or chopped up leaves) 2 � 4 inches thick to help keep down weeds and maintain a consistently cool soil temperature.

Special Note: Deer can be major problem with edible tulips and lilies. Cornell University trials of products such as Deer Off, which must be applied at emergence and until bloom, have had some success.

A Sampling of Bulbs for Perennializing: (return for several years)

Narcissus 'Las Vegas'
N. 'Topolino'
N. 'Camelot'
N. 'Romance'
Tulipa 'Princess Irene'
T. 'Big Smile'
T. 'Burgundy Lace'
Allium 'Globemaster'
Colchicum 'Giant'
Fritillaria Imperialis 'Rubra Maxima'


A Sampling of Bulbs for Naturalizing: (return & multiply)

Allium triquetrum (in woodland areas)
Crocus tommasinianus 'Ruby Giant'
Eranthis cilicica (in damp woodland areas)
Erythronium (in woodland areas)
Leucojum aestivum (at a stream edge)
Scilla siberica (in woodland areas or lawn)
Triteleia 'Queen Fabiola' (in dry meadow areas)

Region "F" � East Central


Optimum Planting Time: October 1st - November 30th
USDA Hardiness Zones: 5, 6, 7

A Guide to U.S. Bulb Planting Regions

Region "F" � East Central
Yours is an excellent area for most spring-flowering bulbs with moderately cold winters, ample moisture, and warm to hot summers.

General Instructions:
Plant bulbs in the fall starting when nighttime temperatures stay between 40-50�F. But, be sure to plant approximately six weeks before the ground freezes to allow sufficient time for rooting. Bulbs will root best in cool soil and once rooted undergo natural changes that keep them from freezing. Water your bulbs after planting to help them start the rooting process.

After planting, apply slow release "bulb food" fertilizer on the top of the ground to supply nutrients for the second year's bloom. (Bulbs are already fully charged with energy for peak flowering performance in their first spring bloom season.) Do not put the fertilizer in the hole with the bulb as this may burn the bulb's tender roots. PLEASE NOTE: Modern bone meal generally has little value as a bulb fertilizer and often draws rodents and dogs that dig up the bulbs looking for bones!

After the ground cools or freezes, cover your bulb beds with a lightweight mulch (pine needles, buckwheat hulls, straw or chopped up leaves) 2 � 4 inches thick to help keep down weeds and maintain a consistently cool soil temperature.

Special Note: Extend the bloom season by selecting a range of bulbs that flower throughout the early-spring, mid-spring and late-spring seasons. Remember that daffodils, leucojum, galanthus and other members of the Amaryllidaceae family are generally considered pest-resistant.

A Sampling of Bulbs for Perennializing: (return for several years)

Narcissus 'Gigantic Star'
N. 'Fortissimo'
N. 'Pink Charm'
N. 'Tete-a-Tete'
Tulipa 'Golden Parade'
T. 'Monsella'
T. 'Red Riding Hood'
Allium schubertii
Chionodoxa 'Pink Giant'
Crocus chrysanthus 'Ard Schenk'

A Sampling of Bulbs for Naturalizing: (return & multiply)

Allium roseum
Anemone nemorosa (in woodland areas)
Chionodoxa forbesii
Crocus sieberi 'Firefly'
Crocus tommasinianus
Geranium tuberosum
Hyacinthoides hispanica
Nectaroscordum siculum

Region "G" � South Central


Optimum Planting Time: October 15th - December 15th
USDA Hardiness Zones: 7, 8

A Guide to U.S. Bulb Planting Regions

Region "G" � South Central
Your moderate climate with its mildly cold winters and hot, humid summers, suits most spring-flowering bulbs except for those that have longer cold requirements and drier summer dormancy.

General Instructions:
Plant bulbs in the fall starting when nighttime temperatures stay between 40-50�F. But, be sure to plant approximately six weeks before the ground freezes to allow sufficient time for rooting. Bulbs will root best in cool soil and once rooted undergo natural changes that keep them from freezing. Water your bulbs after planting to help them start the rooting process.

After planting, apply slow release "bulb food" fertilizer on the top of the ground to supply nutrients for the second year's bloom. (Bulbs are already fully charged with energy for peak flowering performance in their first spring bloom season.) Do not put the fertilizer in the hole with the bulb as this may burn the bulb's tender roots. PLEASE NOTE: Modern bone meal generally has little value as a bulb fertilizer and often draws rodents and dogs that dig up the bulbs looking for bones!

After the ground cools or freezes, cover your bulb beds with a lightweight mulch (pine needles, buckwheat hulls, straw or chopped up leaves) 2 � 4 inches thick to help keep down weeds and maintain a consistently cool soil temperature.

Special Note: A number of bulbs do naturalize in this climate. Many heirloom or 'pass along' bulbs are found around old homes and cemeteries. Some tropical, semi-tender bulbs winter-over here with proper micro-climate placement and a mulch blanket.

A Sampling of Bulbs for Perennializing: (return for several years)

Narcissus 'Cheerfulness'
N. 'Jetfire'
N. 'Minnow'
N. 'Rijnveld's Early Sensation'
N. 'Thalia'
Tulipa 'Oxford'
T. turkestanica
Hippeastrum (Amaryllis-'Tulips' for the south)


A Sampling of Bulbs for Naturalizing: (return & multiply)

N. jonquilla
T. clusiana
'Cynthia'
T. saxatilis
Allium neapolitanum
Allium sphaerocephalon
Dracunculus vulgaris
Muscari neglectum
Triteleia laxa
'Queen Fabiola'

region "H" � Tropical


Optimum Planting Time: December 1st - January 31st
USDA Hardiness Zones: 10

A Guide to U.S. Bulb Planting Regions

Region "H" � Tropical
Your climate seldom if ever gets a frost and has hot humid summers. It is the ideal climate for a vast assortment of summer-blooming, tropical bulbs, but not particularly hospitable to the traditional hardy spring-flowering bulbs such as tulips.

General Instructions:
The range of lush tropical bulbs available to you is mind-boggling ("to die for" as some Northerners would say!). But hardy spring-flowering bulbs such as tulips are a fish out of water, in your neck of the woods. Still, if you crave seeing tulips in spring, check out your local garden retailer or florist for pots of nursery-grown tulips and other traditional spring bloomers.

Special Note: The group of bulbs below are from warmer climates that do not require much if any cooling. Hippeastrum (amaryllis) -- which thrive in hot, humid climates -- make perfect 'tulips for the south' with their sturdy stems and large velvety flowers in a broad range of colors (including stripes!). In general, in areas where the garden isn't far above sea level, raised beds can improve drainage after hot, humid, summer storms.

A Sampling of Bulbs for Perennializing: (return for several years)

Hippeastrum Papilio 'Butterfly'
Hippeastrum
'Naughty Lady'
Other Hippeastrum (amaryllis)


A Sampling of Bulbs for Naturalizing: (return & multiply)

Oxalis regnellii var. triangularis
Oxalis tetraphylla
Oxalis tetraphylla
'Iron Cross'
And many other tender summer-flowering bulbs

"I" � Gulf Coast


Optimum Planting Time: October 1st - December 31st
USDA Hardiness Zones: 8, 9

A Guide to U.S. Bulb Planting Regions

Region "I" � Gulf Coast
Your area, with its mild winter climate and hot humid summers, is perfect for most summer-blooming bulbs - and fine for a surprising number of spring bloomers too, if carefully chosen.

General Instructions:
Most daffodils and other narcissi will thrive in your area even without pre-cooling, but tulips will require more effort! Most hardy spring-flowering bulbs must be treated as annuals in your area as there is not normally a long enough cold period to trigger the bloom cycle. To pre-cool tulips, hyacinths and crocuses, store at 35-45� F, for instance in a refrigerator crisper drawer, for a minimum of 8+ weeks and up to 14+ weeks. It's important to avoid storing bulbs near ripening fruit, as it gives off ethylene gas which can damage the flower inside the bulb. Once removed from cool storage, plant bulbs immediately.

Special Note: Your best bets are bulbs that originate from warmer climates and do not require much if any cooling. Top performers are listed below. Other local favorites for fall planting include freesias, Anemone coronaria, and rununculus. Among the tulips (which do require cooling), Darwin Hybrids are reported as among the best performers.

A Sampling of Bulbs for Perennializing: (return for several years)

Narcissus 'Avalanche'
N. 'Baby Moon'
N. 'Carlton'
N. 'Erlicheer'
N. 'Saint Keverne'
Pancratium maritimum

A Sampling of Bulbs for Naturalizing: (return & multiply)

N. jonquilla
N. odorus campernelli
Dracunculus vulgaris
Gladiolus communis byzantinus
Hyacinthoides hispanica
Ipheion uniflorum
Leucojum aestivum
Ornithogalum nutans
Oxalis tetraphylla
'Iron Cross'

Region "J" � Northern Central


Optimum Planting Time: September 15th � November 1st
USDA Hardiness Zones: 3, 4, 5

A Guide to U.S. Bulb Planting Regions

Region "J" � Northern Central
This lovely area has very cold winters and moderate summers. The moisture level is moderate to dry.

General Instructions:
Plant bulbs in the fall starting when nighttime temperatures stay between 40-50�F. But, be sure to plant approximately six weeks before the ground freezes to allow sufficient time for rooting. Bulbs will root best in cool soil and once rooted undergo natural changes that keep them from freezing. Water your bulbs after planting to help them start the rooting process.

After planting, apply slow release "bulb food" fertilizer on the top of the ground to supply nutrients for the second year's bloom. (Bulbs are already fully charged with energy for peak flowering performance in their first spring bloom season.) Do not put the fertilizer in the hole with the bulb as this may burn the bulb's tender roots. PLEASE NOTE: Modern bone meal generally has little value as a bulb fertilizer and often draws rodents and dogs that dig up the bulbs looking for bones!

After the ground cools or freezes, cover your bulb beds with a lightweight mulch (pine needles, buckwheat hulls, straw or chopped up leaves) 2 � 4 inches thick to help keep down weeds and maintain a consistently cool soil temperature.

Special Note: Because this area may have a greater risk of a dry autumn, a bit of extra water after planting may help the rooting process. When there is little or no snow cover, an extra layer of mulch should help keep the bulbs at a consistent cool temperature after they have rooted, resulting in more beautiful blossoms.

A Sampling of Bulbs for Perennializing: (return for several years)

Narcissus 'Actaea'
N. 'Hillstar' (American bred)
N. 'Manly'
N. 'Sun Disc'
Tulipa 'Greenland'
T. 'Menton'
T. 'White Triumphator'
Allium aflatunense 'Purple Sensation'
Camassia cusickii (damp meadow)
Eremurus robustus

A Sampling of Bulbs for Naturalizing: (return & multiply)

N. poeticus var. recurvus
T. clusiana chrysantha
Allium flavum
Allium oreophilum
Eremurus stenophyllus
Muscari azureum
Scilla siberica

Region "K" � Central & Great Plains


[Optimum Planting Time: September 30th - November 30th
USDA Hardiness Zones: 5, 6

A Guide to U.S. Bulb Planting Regions

Region "K" � Central & Great Plains
Your climate can experience cold winters and hot summers with occasional extreme temperature variations and moderate moisture. With a little care, conditions are great for a wide variety of hardy spring-flowering bulbs.

General Instructions:
Plant bulbs in the fall starting when nighttime temperatures stay between 40-50�F. But, be sure to plant approximately six weeks before the ground freezes to allow sufficient time for rooting. Bulbs will root best in cool soil and once rooted undergo natural changes that keep them from freezing. Water your bulbs after planting to help them start the rooting process.

After planting, apply slow release "bulb food" fertilizer on the top of the ground to supply nutrients for the second year's bloom. (Bulbs are already fully charged with energy for peak flowering performance in their first spring bloom season.) Do not put the fertilizer in the hole with the bulb as this may burn the bulb's tender roots. PLEASE NOTE: Modern bone meal generally has little value as a bulb fertilizer and often draws rodents and dogs that dig up the bulbs looking for bones!

After the ground cools or freezes, cover your bulb beds with a lightweight mulch (pine needles, buckwheat hulls, straw or chopped up leaves) 2 � 4 inches thick to help keep down weeds and maintain a consistently cool soil temperature.

Special Note: Plant your spring-flowering bulbs in areas with less exposure to wind and extreme cold to extend blooming season and to protect early or late bloomers from extremes in temperature variation. If the spring is dry, water weekly while the foliage is green.

A Sampling of Bulbs for Perennializing: (return for several years)

Narcissus 'Cassata'
N.
'Quince'
N. 'Sir Winston Churchill'
N. 'Suzy'
Tulipa batalinii 'Bright Gem'
T. 'Mickey Mouse'
T. 'Olympic Flame'
Allium 'Gladiator'
Hyacinthus 'Pink Pearl'

A Sampling of Bulbs for Naturalizing: (return & multiply)

T. tarda
Allium caeruleum
Chionodoxa forbesii
(for shady areas)
Crocus tommasinianus
Dichelostemma congestum
Eremurus stenophyllus
Ixiolirion tataricum
Muscari armeniacum

Region "L" � Rocky Mountains


Optimum Planting Time: September 15th � November 1st
USDA Hardiness Zones: 2, 3, 4

A Guide to U.S. Bulb Planting Regions

Region "L" � Rocky Mountains
Your largely alpine environment with long cold winters and moderate summers make a good environment for hardy spring-flowering bulbs.

General Instructions:
Plant bulbs in the fall starting when nighttime temperatures stay between 40-50�F. But, be sure to plant approximately six weeks before the ground freezes to allow sufficient time for rooting. Bulbs will root best in cool soil and once rooted undergo natural changes that keep them from freezing. Water your bulbs after planting to help them start the rooting process.

After planting, apply slow release "bulb food" fertilizer on the top of the ground to supply nutrients for the second year's bloom. (Bulbs are already fully charged with energy for peak flowering performance in their first spring bloom season.) Do not put the fertilizer in the hole with the bulb as this may burn the bulb's tender roots. PLEASE NOTE: Modern bone meal generally has little value as a bulb fertilizer and often draws rodents and dogs that dig up the bulbs looking for bones!

After the ground cools or freezes, cover your bulb beds with a lightweight mulch (pine needles, buckwheat hulls, straw or chopped up leaves) 2 � 4 inches thick to help keep down weeds and maintain a consistently cool soil temperature.

Special Note: A very good area for growing bulbs according to Rocky Mountain authors/gardeners, Rob Proctor and Lauren Springer. They integrate lots of different kinds of bulbs into their myriad of colorful gardens in and around Denver.

A Sampling of Bulbs for Perennializing: (return for several years)

Narcissus 'Flower Drift'
N. 'Flower Record'
N. 'Salome'
N. 'Sun Disc'
Tulipa 'Lady Jane'
T. 'Ivory Floradale' (& other Darwin Hybrid tulips)
T. 'Toronto'
Colchicum autumnale
Crocus speciosus
Species crocus
Iris reticulata 'Harmony'

A Sampling of Bulbs for Naturalizing: (return & multiply)

N. poeticus var. recurvus
T. tarda
Allium caeruleum
Allium flavum
Allium neapolitanum
Camassia leichtlinii
Eremurus stenophyllus
Erythronium

Region "M" � Arid West


Optimum Planting Time: September 30th - November 30th
USDA Hardiness Zones: 5, 6, 7

A Guide to U.S. Bulb Planting Regions

Region "M" � Arid West
Your region of relatively long cool winters, very hot to moderate dry summers and low moisture, is good for growing many bulbs, especially those native to dry climates. Though this is true for most of this large diverse region, your specific climatic conditions should be taken into account. You must especially consider major factors like high-mountain altitude, low-desert heat and sheltered valley basin environments.

General Instructions:
Plant bulbs in the fall starting when nighttime temperatures stay between 40-50�F. But, be sure to plant approximately six weeks before the ground freezes to allow sufficient time for rooting. Bulbs will root best in cool soil and once rooted undergo natural changes that keep them from freezing. Water your bulbs after planting to help them start the rooting process.

After planting, apply slow release "bulb food" fertilizer on the top of the ground to supply nutrients for the second year's bloom. (Bulbs are already fully charged with energy for peak flowering performance in their first spring bloom season.) Do not put the fertilizer in the hole with the bulb as this may burn the bulb's tender roots. PLEASE NOTE: Modern bone meal generally has little value as a bulb fertilizer and often draws rodents and dogs that dig up the bulbs looking for bones!

After the ground cools or freezes, cover your bulb beds with a lightweight mulch (pine needles, buckwheat hulls, straw or chopped up leaves) 2 � 4 inches thick to help keep down weeds and maintain a consistently cool soil temperature.

Special Note: Because this region encompasses numerous pockets of extreme climate variance, we suggest supplementing the information here by referring to Sunset Publication's Western Garden Book or going to http://www.sunset.com/. Both sources include information on some ten specific climates within this region.

A Sampling of Bulbs for Perennializing: (return for several years)

Narcissus 'Hawera'
N. 'Quail'
N. 'Scarlet Gem'
N. 'Sun Disc'
Tulipa bakeri 'Lilac Wonder'
T. batalinii 'Bronze Charm'
T. linifolia
T. 'Queen of Night'
T. 'White Triumphator'
Allium karataviense 'Ivory Queen'
Crocus vernus cultivars
Muscar cultivars

A Sampling of Bulbs for Naturalizing: (return & multiply)

Allium neapolitanum
Allium uniflorum
Eremurus
Fritillaria purdyi
Triteleia hyacinthia
Ipheion

Region "N" � Northern Pacific Coast


Optimum Planting Time: October 1st - December 1st
USDA Hardiness Zones: 8

A Guide to U.S. Bulb Planting Regions

Region "N" � Northern Pacific Coast
With long cool, wet winters and springs, followed by dry summers and falls, your region is close to perfect for many spring-flowering bulbs. This climate is about as close to the English countryside as we have in the USA.

General Instructions:
Plant bulbs in the fall starting when nighttime temperatures stay between 40-50�F. But, be sure to plant approximately six weeks before the ground freezes to allow sufficient time for rooting. Bulbs will root best in cool soil and once rooted undergo natural changes that keep them from freezing. Water your bulbs after planting to help them start the rooting process.

After planting, apply slow release "bulb food" fertilizer on the top of the ground to supply nutrients for the second year's bloom. (Bulbs are already fully charged with energy for peak flowering performance in their first spring bloom season.) Do not put the fertilizer in the hole with the bulb as this may burn the bulb's tender roots. PLEASE NOTE: Modern bone meal generally has little value as a bulb fertilizer and often draws rodents and dogs that dig up the bulbs looking for bones!

After the ground cools or freezes, cover your bulb beds with a lightweight mulch (pine needles, buckwheat hulls, straw or chopped up leaves) 2 � 4 inches thick to help keep down weeds and maintain a consistently cool soil temperature.

Special Note: Begin to plant when the soil cools off but before the weather becomes too wet and uncomfortable, making planting a chore instead of a pleasure. Because your zone 8 looks to be warm on the USDA Hardiness Map, be sure to let mail order companies know you need your bulbs delivered before the heavy rains come. Provide a specific delivery week. Otherwise, they may send your order too late.

A Sampling of Bulbs for Perennializing: (return for several years)

Narcissus 'Accent'
N. 'Flower Record'
N. 'Jetfire'
N. 'Pipit'
Tulipa 'Angelique'
T. 'Black Parrot'
T. 'Little Beauty'
Allium rosenbachianum
Anemone blanda
'Blue Shades'
Dactylorhiza maculata 'Madame Butterfly'

A Sampling of Bulbs for Naturalizing: (return & multiply)

Anemone ranunculoides
Arum italicum
Calochortus
'Golden Orb'
Dichelostemma 'Pink Diamond'
Eranthis cilicica
Galanthus nivalis
'Viridi-apice'
Hermodactylus tuberosa
Nectaroscordum siculum

Region "O" � Southern Pacific CoastAl


Optimum Planting Time: See Below
USDA Hardiness Zones: 9, 10

A Guide to U.S. Bulb Planting Regions

Region "O" � Southern Pacific Coast

There are two major fall planting seasons for the Southern Pacific Coast:

Plant Mid-August (or as soon as available) into December

Bulbs native to Mediterranean and other climates, such as:
babiana, sparaxis, tritonia, watsonia, bearded iris, ixia, Oxalis purpurea, Scilla Peruviana, freesias, the small alliums, etc.

Plant Mid-October through late January

Dutch bulbs including daffodils, dwarf narcissi, rununculus, Anemone coronaria, Spanish bluebells, muscari (grape hyacinths), lilies, Dutch iris.

Many are envious of your glorious year-round weather. But few realize how great your region is for gardening with flower bulbs! True, many of the bulbs you plant in fall are different from those planted in the other regions. Classic "spring bulbs" such as tulips, hyacinths and crocuses will need pre-cooling before planting in your region and will most likely perform as annuals. (See pre-cooling info below).

But others - including the big yellow trumpet daffodils, dwarf narcissi, and iris -- need no special treatment at all and should perennialize or naturalize, if not heavily watered when bulbs are dormant (after flowering, once leaves have died back). Some tulips do better than others for you: try Single Lates, Double Lates, Lily-Flowered, and some of the species types. Local garden centers are generally reliable for stocking bulbs appropriate to your region.

Special Note: To pre-cool tulips, hyacinths and crocuses, store at 35-45� F, for instance in a refrigerator crisper drawer, for a minimum of 6 weeks and up to 14+ weeks. It's important to avoid storing bulbs near ripening fruit, as it gives off ethylene gas which can damage the flower inside the bulb. Once removed from cool storage, plant bulbs immediately. Once cooled at least six weeks, bulbs may be planted anytime from November through January - and regardless of when planted, they will bloom in late February/March.

A Sampling of Bulbs for Perennializing: (return for several years)

Tulip 'Lilac Wonder'
Narcissus 'Avalanche'
N. 'Carlton'
N. 'Ice Follies'
N. 'Golden Bells'
N. 'Jenny'
N. 'Thalia'
N. 'Jetfire'
N. 'Tete-a-tete'
Dutch iris
Lilies
The small alliums

A Sampling of Bulbs for Naturalizing: (return & multiply)

Allium sphaerocephalon
Spanish bluebells
Scilla Peruviana
Oxalis purpurea
Bearded iris
Paperwhite narcissi (all types)
Freesia
Watsonia
Sparaxis
Tritonia
Leucojum aestivum
Ixia

Region "P" � Alaska


Optimum Planting Time: September 15th - October 15th
USDA Hardiness Zones: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7

A Guide to U.S. Bulb Planting Regions

Region "P" � Alaska
Your area is large and variable. Most common are very long, dark, cold winters, short days and a short growing season. However, a little creativity can go a long way!

General Instructions:
Plant bulbs in the fall starting when nighttime temperatures stay between 40-50�F. But, be sure to plant approximately six weeks before the ground freezes to allow sufficient time for rooting. Bulbs will root best in cool soil and once rooted undergo natural changes that keep them from freezing. Water your bulbs after planting to help them start the rooting process.

After planting, apply slow release "bulb food" fertilizer on the top of the ground to supply nutrients for the second year's bloom. (Bulbs are already fully charged with energy for peak flowering performance in their first spring bloom season.) Do not put the fertilizer in the hole with the bulb as this may burn the bulb's tender roots. PLEASE NOTE: Modern bone meal generally has little value as a bulb fertilizer and often draws rodents and dogs that dig up the bulbs looking for bones!

After the ground cools or freezes, cover your bulb beds with a lightweight mulch (pine needles, buckwheat hulls, straw or chopped up leaves) 2 � 4 inches thick to help keep down weeds and maintain a consistently cool soil temperature.

Special Note: Plant your spring-flowering bulbs in warmer protected areas with less exposure to wind and extreme cold to extend blooming season and protect early or late bloomers from extremes in temperature variation. If the spring is dry, water weekly while the foliage is green.

A Sampling of Bulbs for Perennializing: (return for several years)

Allium christophii
Allium 'Mount Everest'
Trumpet Narcissus
Small Cupped Narcissus
N. 'Actaea'
Greigii Hybrid Tulips
Darwin Hybrid Tulips

A Sampling of Bulbs for Naturalizing: (return & multiply)

Allium moly
Allium oreophilum
Camassia leichtlinii
Chionodoxa forbesii
Crocus tommasinianus
Fritillaria camschantcensis
Galanthus elwesii
N. poeticus var. recurvus
 

 

 

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